stuff!!!
stuff!!!
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cinephiliabeyond:

“On every film you suffer, but on some you really suffer”
Martin Scorsese’s commencement address to the 2014 graduating class of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. “The audience was abuzz with excitement in anticipation of honored speaker and NYU alumnus Martin Scorsese’s address, which was both conversational and inspiring. The legendary director included many anecdotes from his own time in college, when NYU was still Washington Square College. ‘It was [my cinema professor Haig Manoogian] and this school that taught me I could be more than crazy,’ Scorsese said.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going.
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keyframedaily:

A very happy 90th birthday to the great cinematographer Raoul Coutard.
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keyframedaily:

Jean-Luc Godard's Band of Outsiders (1964).
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bbook:

Goodbye First Love
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theniftyfifties:

James Dean
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aconversationoncool:

Twin Palms House, Julius Shulman, 1957.
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mubiblog:

Francis Ford Coppola, Mel Brooks, and Jean-Luc Godard.
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phylwx:

Wendy Carlos on the Moog, 1960.
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keyframedaily:

John Boorman’s Point Blank (1967).
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cinephiliabeyond:

Martin Scorsese’s statement supporting Kodak’s continued production of film stock, courtesy of our friends at The Playlist.

We have many names for what we do — cinema, movies, motion pictures. And… film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye — really, that could be easily done. Too easily.It seems like we’re always being reminded that film is, after all, a business. But film is also an art form, and young people who are driven to make films should have access to the tools and materials that were the building blocks of that art form. Would anyone dream of telling young artists to throw away their paints and canvases because iPads are so much easier to carry? Of course not. In the history of motion pictures, only a minuscule percentage of the works comprising our art form was not shot on film. Everything we do in HD is an effort to recreate the look of film. Film, even now, offers a richer visual palette than HD. And, we have to remember that film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies. We have no assurance that digital informaton will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.Our industry — our filmmakers — rallied behind Kodak because we knew that we couldn’t afford to lose them, the way we’ve lost so many other film stocks. This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love. —Martin Scorsese


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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nevver:

Never will